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SELECT A FOREST RESTORATION PROJECT THAT’S MEANINGFUL TO YOU
SALMON RIVER RESTORATION PROJECT
Salmon/Scott River Ranger District,
Klamath National Forest, California


American Forests is working with the U.S. Forest Service to plant more than 173,000 mixed conifer seedlings across nearly 800 acres that were severely burned by wildfire in 2013. The plantings will provide important watershed protection for tributaries of the Salmon River and critical habitat for many bird species, including bald eagle, northern goshawk and the threatened northern spotted owl. The project also aims to create an overstory of conifers to provide shade and thermal cover to streams, cooling the water for fish species.

This section of Klamath is considered steep and rugged, but it serves as a peaceful recreation spot for outdoor enthusiasts, including kayakers, hikers, mushroom seekers and hunters, among others.
CHIPPEWA BLOWDOWN RESTORATION PROJECT
Blackduck, Deer River and Walker Ranger Districts,
Chippewa National Forest, Minnesota


American Forests is working to support the U.S. Forest Service in its ongoing efforts to replant millions of seedlings in an area devastated by a massive blowdown of trees in 2012. This year’s part of this multi-year program will plant 200,000 mixed conifers in a part of the Chippewa National Forest which has lost large stands of mature pines.

The Chippewa National Forest (CNF) of central Minnesota boasts one of the most prolific breeding areas for the American bald eagle. The large stands of mature red and white pine that have traditionally grown there are part of the reason why. In 2012, a severe storm with 80-85 mph winds caused a massive blowdown of trees within the CNF, with approximately 12,000 of the affected acres falling in what is considered the heart of “pine country” in the forest.
VIRGINIA LONGLEAF PINE RESTORATION PROJECT
South Quay Sandhills and Chub Sandhills State Natural Area Preserves, Virginia

American Forests will reforest 550 acres in two Virginia nature preserves with a total of 300,000 longleaf pine seedlings. These tracts support some of the highest diversity of rare plant and animal species in southeastern Virginia.

On the shore of what was once an ancient estuary, Chub Sandhill Natural Area Preserve features a series of low sandhills, sandy upland flats and riparian wetlands along the Nottoway River. There are shallow ponds that serve as a breeding habitat for a variety of amphibians, such as spotted salamanders and eastern narrowmouth toads. These, in turn, attract belted kingfishers and wading birds such as greenbacked herons and great blue herons.